grok
To understand profoundly through intuition or empathy.
This one was neologized into being by Heinlein in Stranger in a Strange Land. It’s a nerd thing, really.
oneiric
Of, relating to, or suggestive of dreams.
desiteratum
Something considered necessary or highly desirable.
See also “Computer”
desuetude
The cessation of use; disuse; discontinuance of practice, custom, or fashion.
supererogatory
More than is needed or required.
It sounds dirty, like, “First we went out to dinner, and then we had supererogatory sex.”
fin de siècle
A phrase mostly used adjectively in English to signify: belonging to, or characteristic of, the close of the (19th) century; hence, modern; “up-to-date;” sophisticated; world-weary; decadent.
I didn’t know it was used adjectively; now I can write even more pretentiously. Rock!
ratiocination
The process of reasoning, or deducing conclusions from premises; deductive reasoning.
Using a lot of different synonyms for “rationalization” is very fin de siècle way of writing.
celerity
Rapidity of motion; quickness; swiftness.
e.g. “The hungry dieting celebrity ate her celery with celerity, but certaintly wasn’t sated.”
redress
1. To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.
2. To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.
3. To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.
e.g. “After Justin Timberlake exposed Janet Jackson’s boob, he apparently never thought to redress her; instead, she had to redress the nation, Clinton-like, in a televised apology.”
logorrhea
Excessive talkativeness or wordiness.
Yes, it comes from the same roots as “diarrhea.” This, really, means “diarrhea of words.”
§909 · December 29, 2005 · Tags: ·

Leave a Reply