I’ve read plenty of them (indicated with boldface), but I’m not entirely sure what to think.

  1. The HitchHiker’s Guide to the Galaxy — Douglas Adams 85% (102)
  2. Nineteen Eighty-Four — George Orwell 79% (92)
  3. Brave New World — Aldous Huxley 69% (77)
  4. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? — Philip Dick 64% (67)
  5. Neuromancer — William Gibson 59% (66)
  6. Dune — Frank Herbert 53% (54)
  7. I, Robot — Isaac Asimov 52% (54)
  8. Foundation — Isaac Asimov 47% (47)
  9. The Colour of Magic — Terry Pratchett 46% (46)
  10. Microserfs — Douglas Coupland 43% (44)
  11. Snow Crash — Neal Stephenson 37% (37)
  12. Watchmen — Alan Moore & Dave Gibbons 38% (37)
  13. Cryptonomicon — Neal Stephenson 36% (36)
  14. Consider Phlebas — Iain M Banks 34% (35)
  15. Stranger in a Strange Land — Robert Heinlein 33% (33)
  16. The Man in the High Castle — Philip K Dick 34% (32)
  17. American Gods — Neil Gaiman 31% (29)
  18. The Diamond Age — Neal Stephenson 27% (27)
  19. The Illuminatus! Trilogy — Robert Shea & Robert Anton Wilson 23% (21)
  20. Trouble with Lichen – John Wyndham 21% (19)

Some of them, like Colour of Magic, I just plain didn’t like, though that remains a point of contention. Others, I’ve not read the indicated work, but others by the same author (Starship Troopers, and not Stranger in a Strange Land. Still others seem stuck on the “To Read” list (Illuminatus! Trilogy).

Were I to make my own list, however, I would feel the need to remove graphic novels from the running, as well as include things like early Frankowski (Copernick’s Rebellion, though short, was superb), the Doom series (by Dafydd ab Hugh), and something by Verne—he’s only considered the father of science fiction, after all.

§855 · November 21, 2005 · Tags: ·

3 Comments to “Top 20 Geek Novels”

  1. Andy says:

    Wow, I’m surprised I have read more of these than you. It goes back in part, I suppose, to my predilection for older fiction over the modern.

  2. Karen says:

    “Stranger in a Strange Land” is a real break with Heinlein’s earlier works. His later novels, like “Stranger” are more… metaphysical? not sure of the right word. Worth reading.

    I was surprised that the Lord of the Rings trilogy didn’t make the list. But then, I’ve only read a couple of the listed books. Maybe I’m not a real geek after all.

  3. Ben says:

    You’d think Tolkein would make it, but the list seems to be entirely science fiction and no fantasy. Guess it’s more of a “Trekkie” geek instead of a “Dungeons & Dragons” geek.

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